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Catalina Direct Discussion Topics / Catalina 22 Discussion Area / Cabin / Water under dinette table floor???
 
 
Author Water under dinette table floor???
Robert Thomas
Wakefield, RI

Boat Name: Nautigirl

Model/Year: Catalina 22

Hull No.

Hailing Port: QDNYC, N. Kingstown, RI
05/12/2005 7:14 PM Pacific Time

Hello all,
I just noticed that when I step on the floor under the dinette table, (had it out for maintenence) that I can hear water slosh around. There appears to be a compartment under the dinette floor that holds water since there is a bulkhead just fore and aft of this piece of molded in floor and the only way water could have gotten in here is if the boat was heeled hard to port or the water level got high enough to allow water to pass over the top of the bulkheads where they end at the turn of the bilge. Does this make any sense? I hope I am describing this correctly. How do I get the water out? I was thinking of drilling/cutting a 1/4" hole or slot in the dinette floor down near the keel trunk to drain the water. Any ideas? I would leave the hole open to allow drainage in future. Thanks, RT
Al Gearing
Burleson, Texas

Boat Name: Torch of Freedom

Model/Year: C-22/'76

Hull No. 6448

Hailing Port: Arlington YC
05/13/2005 6:01 AM Pacific Time

I didn't realize that there were bulkheads fore and aft of the table area, however, I'll go look. In the mean time I would drill those holes, they were called 'limbers' in the old wood framed boats, and they connected all the bilge areas. However, I would make them man sized holes, a 1/4" hole can clog up too easily, a 1/2" at least. You are not going to weaken the structure any and getting the water to flow to a place were you can get at it is more important.
As for the cause, on 501 a crew happened to be below when we took a knock down and saw the water coming in from under the rub rail. I don't know if I ever got it stopped, but it only happened on knockdowns which are infrequent enough not to worry about.
For what it's worth, Al Ge
Al Gearing
Burleson, Texas

Boat Name: Torch of Freedom

Model/Year: C-22/'76

Hull No. 6448

Hailing Port: Arlington YC
05/14/2005 9:07 AM Pacific Time

I just looked under the seat area and found on 6448, at least, that there is a hole from the front seat right along the 3-4" high keel well. and in the back it is open about 3/4" square, sort of hole. The bulk head does not attach to the outer hull at that point, so there is a limber all the way.



Boat Name:

Model/Year:

Hull No.

Hailing Port:
05/14/2005 10:29 AM Pacific Time

I'm not sure, but I think what you have described is actually a conduit for electrical wires to run through. That is the way my 1986 is set up.
Al Gearing
Burleson, Texas

Boat Name: Torch of Freedom

Model/Year: C-22/'76

Hull No. 6448

Hailing Port: Arlington YC
05/15/2005 8:21 AM Pacific Time

I don't think the tunnel along the keel is for electrical wiring, it is the lowest point in the boat.

But, speaking of water. The boat had been sitting ing the yard without being sailed for some time and so I boiught it with a conversation over the phone, it had a new hull paint job and a double axel trailor, and for $1000 and a bottom paint job for the boat he just got from his dad, I thought I couldn't go wrong. There was20-30 gals of water in the boat when I went to sail it. All the deck fittings were loose because the wood backing plates had dryed up, and the windows leaked. After drying the boat out for almost a year in the shed, filling all the holes, painting the non-walkways and reseating with bedding compound all the through deck fittings, I thought I was dry. Now the first rain on the closed up boat and I have about a half a pint of water on the starboard side of the keel tunnel in the battery compartment. Where would it be coming in? Any ideas? Could the packing clan on the cockpit drain valve leak that much? Everything was dry by the time I saw it, so it is mystery. Help? Thanks,
Al Ge
Eric Sachau
Tulsa, OK

Boat Name:

Model/Year:

Hull No.

Hailing Port:
05/15/2005 9:51 PM Pacific Time

I had the same problem when I bought my much neglected boat. despite hot Oklahoma summer weather, the water would never evaportate. I was finally able to drain it very easily into the area where the battery should sit under the keel winch. I raised the tongue of the trailer as high as possible until the back of the trailer hit pavement. I left it over night and 100% of the water had moved to the battery area where I was able to vacuum it out. best of luck. Eric
Tim Florek
Neenah, Wisconsin

Boat Name: Love n Luck

Model/Year: C22 1981

Hull No. 10301

Hailing Port: Neenah
05/31/2005 12:53 PM Pacific Time

Here's a follow up on this topic. I had the water too and the tilting of the boat worked. My boat is still dry docked.... My premature newborn swabby would be the reason. So more time to finish some projects.
How "without dropping the keel" could I check to see if my Keel trunk was leaking. Does a hose under the boat work or would I need to put in the water. I 've never had a lot of water but some water in the boat after a day sail. I am going to moor it not trailor it this year and I want to know if there is a way to check.
Aaron M Benham
33a Loomis Hights

Boat Name: Tidely-Idley: The never ending project

Model/Year: 1978 C22

Hull No. 8070

Hailing Port:
10/22/2005 7:25 PM Pacific Time

Hello every one...
I have found this discussion to be most usefull in my attempted restoration/refit of me "free" 78 c22 and I thank you all for all of the useful information and advise.
I knew before that there is no such thing as a "free" boat but I figure if I screw it up, what am I out besides some marine plywood, glass cloth and resin. And besides, I'll have some great tools when I'm done.
As for the problem of unexplained water in the cabin, I had a similar problem with unexplained water seeping onto the cabin sole and the bottom ofthe boat even after a week of dry fall weather (the boat is not in the water). I found that the water was already inside the boat. As you might know, C22's have plywood stiffeners running on both sides of the keel trunk. The one on the port side runs under the dinette table floor. I discovered that when these get water logged, they can hold an amazingly large quantity of water which seeps up from undernith. If you look in the lockers on either side of the dinnette table (fron and back), you will find a raised area in the floor. That is where the plywood is laminated in and it is covered with 2-3 layres of fiberglass. I cut out the top skin of the fiberglass in that area on both sides. So far, I have vacumed about 2-3 gallons of water out of the plywood (port side alone) the top 2 layres of which have delaminated. I suggest that you drill a hole through the top skin into the plywood then stand on it to see how much water seeps out. Also, does the area feel squishy when you walk on it? If so I suspect you have the same delamination problem. As for the fix, right now I am just letting it dry out, vacuming the water as it seeps out. The decision is whether I want to cut out the cabin sole to replace the plywood or seek an alternative.
Good luck
Uwe Behrendt
Rutland Vermont

Boat Name: Joyful

Model/Year: 1977 C22

Hull No. 7200

Hailing Port: Plunder Bay Orwell VT
10/23/2005 4:56 AM Pacific Time

Hello all
Yes water does get into the boat through the windows stanchions, cleats and anything else that is attached to the deck including your mast electrical connections. Fist fix the windows, Next check the electrical connections by the mast, then the stanchions unbolt them and reseal them all then the tie down cleats the same thing. All these things combined all up to a lot of water This does not include the hatch seals if the leak then that’s also a source.. Most important check the ob drain next to the volcano to make sure it is tight in the bottom of the boat.

Now to get rid of that watermelon in the billege There are several approaches here I chose not to open my inner shell because I did not think the wood was too bad although when I bought the boat it too had 2 feet of water in it . Here is why, my boat was foamed and this kept the wood somewhat dry my solution Pull out as much of the foam that I could fore and aft A VERY MESSY JOB. The bottom of the foam is like a watermelon over the years it just absorbs water, gallons of it. Tilt the boat bow down as low as possible its easier to get the water out of the bow with a siphon hose through the hatch
Then pore a gallon of full strength bleach into the hull slosh it around by rising and lowering the trailer let it sit 24 hours and then drain it out also. This will kill all the mildew that will have a tendency to grow in the wood as well as the hull.

As for the stringers, There is a product on the market that is used to recoup saturated wood.
It absorbs into the wood and turns hard like epoxy, that’s one approach the other is to suck it out with a shop vac taped to small drain holes about 3 of them the size if a quarter on the right side of the battery. Drill it out with a hole saw and save the plug you are going to reuse them. Attach, tape, your shop vac to the hole and turn it on for 24hours, let it run It will suck out as much water as possible. Continue this process until you think you have it done. Then let things dry out with a dehumidifier if you can. Replace the plugs back into the hole with some epoxy or JB weld don’t plug the center hole.
When it has set up and is hard get yourself about 3 to 4 cans of expandable foam. And shoot the foam into the small hole you left in the plug. The foam will take the path of least resistance or the gaps left by the water and the delimitation. It will eventually creep up the sides of the inner hull. You can make 4 cans disappear very easily and never see a drop. Do not overkill and use too much.
That solved my problem no water all summer on the lake. A tarp over the boom also helps especially if the pop-top is not tight.
I hope this helps

Uwe
Al Gearing
Burleson, Texas

Boat Name: Torch of Freedom

Model/Year: C-22/'76

Hull No. 6448

Hailing Port: Arlington YC
10/23/2005 8:25 AM Pacific Time

Hi, I have not seen any water in the boat for a while, it has been sitting in the boatyard, have only been able to sail it four times this summer, since June. The above discussion seems to have covered my problem. I just kept drying it out with sponges and leaving the cushions and covers off while it sat here in the Texas sun, with a tarp over the cabin and cockpit, loose enough for the air to blow through by having a grommet in the middle and a rope up to the boom. I was thinking of cutting the holes but did not do it. However, I have not done well against other boats, it could be the sails, '92, but I think the weight of the boat is up also. I told Bill Drahiem two months ago that if he had time on his hands he could build me a set of sails, and as this week we have had a wind fall gas lease, that will give me the extra afford them. If he is at the club today I can order them.
Good luck to you all,
Al Ge
Hobie Davidson
Titusville, Fl.

Boat Name: For Sail

Model/Year: 1977

Hull No. 6993

Hailing Port: Titusville
10/23/2005 4:42 PM Pacific Time

Been there doe that when my 1977 filled with rain water. I can give you one very good tip use Acetone poured into your access holes once you think your boat water is removed. The Acetone will get under any existing water left and raise it up to be evaporated. I did that with my boat after a tip from a fellow c22 owner that made spas told me about it. It really works!
Al Gearing
Burleson, Texas

Boat Name: Torch of Freedom

Model/Year: C-22 '76

Hull No. 6448

Hailing Port: Arlington YC
10/24/2005 7:02 AM Pacific Time

Which access holes are you refering to? The ones that it was suggested to drill into the outer hull stiffeners or just the storage access areas? I would sure like to lighten the boat. When new this boat was the hot boat in the area, maybe it's the sailor, I'm not having those results.
Al Ge
Hobie Davidson
Titusville, Fl.

Boat Name: For Sail

Model/Year: 1977

Hull No. 6993

Hailing Port: Titusville
10/24/2005 7:50 AM Pacific Time

Al,
The holes I was reffering to are the holes that have got to be made to let out any trapped water under the dinette forward seating and the cabin soul area that is squeshy under foot. Also tilt you boat to the stern and leave it there for a couple of weeks to drain to stern.

I poured a whole gallon of Acetone into those areas and it worked like a charm. Don't be afraid, it won't hurt anything and will lift the water for evaporation.
Al Gearing
Burleson, Texas

Boat Name: Torch of Freedom

Model/Year: C-22 '76

Hull No. 6448

Hailing Port: Arlington YC
10/25/2005 6:20 AM Pacific Time

Thanks, Hobie, I'll try that if I find any more water, at present I think it is dry. Forgot to look Sunday when I was there for Race Duty, it was cold and 25-30 knots nobody went out.
Al Ge
Eric Robinson
Morehead, Ky

Boat Name:

Model/Year: 1975

Hull No. 5126

Hailing Port: Cave Run Lake
04/15/2006 11:01 AM Pacific Time

I was having the same problem, untill yesterday that is. The problem was, after rain showers, there would be water not only in the floor of my cabin, but also in the hull. The Problem that i found, is that water that was draining out of my cockpit, was going down the drain, and then instead of out of the bottom of the hull (there was a small clog), it was entering the cabin by going back up the galley sink drain, making the drain overflow. And since there is access hole infront of the galley, it would flow as well into the the hull of the boat. But i Corrected the problem but replacing the drain tubes, and taking out the gally sink drain.
Mark Dieterle
Loveland, CO

Boat Name: RANDOM LEIGH

Model/Year: CATALINA 22 / 1978

Hull No. 8639

Hailing Port: BOYD LAKE
04/15/2006 1:40 PM Pacific Time

I bought a 78 swing keel last year and dry sailed it all summer. The only thing critical thing I had done was to have the forward starboard weldment replaced. The prior owner used a non-stainless bolt and rusted it out. The dealer I bought the boat from "as is" did the repair for only the cost of the weldment. He had to access it from the port compartment where the lock down bolt is. He said he fibergalssed the living ^%%$%#@ out of the access hole he needed. I just put the boat in a slip two weeks ago. I now get about 2 gallons of water in the aft dinette seat compartment about every 2-3 days. I've moved my battery out of that compartment. I also get water along the port side of the 2-3" centerboard trunk between that compartment and the dinette table floor. It hasn't rained here in months. I show no water leakage from the lockdown bolt or any plumbing associatted with the Volcano. I haven't even sailed the boat yet due to some recent unplanned surgeries. I'm thinking I may have to pull the boat out and cut out the patch where the access to the weldment was made. Any other ideas would be appreciatted. Thanks, Mark D
Uwe Behrendt
Rutland Vermont

Boat Name: Joyful

Model/Year: 1977 C22

Hull No. 7200

Hailing Port: Plunder Bay Orwell VT
04/16/2006 4:15 AM Pacific Time

After 3 years I’m still fighting small water problems
One big one I found this past winter was under the rub rail extrusion.
I removed the old rub rail for replacement and decided to look under the extrusion, to my surprise there were elongated screw holes and what appears to be gaps in the mating area where the deck and hull meet. A lot of dirt had accumulated over the years.
I went to work with a tube of 3M 5200 and sealed everything including the screws for the rub rail and replaced the new rub rail.
Lets see what happens this summer.

Uwe
Mark Dieterle
Loveland, CO

Boat Name: RANDOM LEIGH

Model/Year: CATALINA 22 / 1978

Hull No. 8639

Hailing Port: BOYD LAKE
04/16/2006 5:58 AM Pacific Time

Uwe, I hope I don't have three years of this one, and I hope you get your issue nailed soon. My water is definitley entering from below the waterline. I live in a very dry climate. I'm sure I have areas on the topside that could allow water in. It would have to rain first, or I would have to take the boat out from the slip and put the rail in the water. At this point I think I'm going to pull the boat out, remove the waterlogged wooden battery holder under the aft port dinette seat. Look for any possible leaks there. Then cut out the repair from the forward port dinette seat compartment and see what I've got to work with there. I need to make a call to Catalina to get a better understanding of the boats construction so that I can narrow things down. I think I'll post my need under the Hull forum. I saw quite a few similar topics. They mostly said runaway from a boat that is bringing water from below the waterline!!

Mark D
Jay Warthen
Foley, AL

Boat Name: Hydro Therapy

Model/Year: C22/82

Hull No.

Hailing Port: Daphne, AL
01/30/2007 12:37 PM Pacific Time

I recently purchased a C22. All storage areas were wet, including under the cockpit. The bilge pump was inoperative. I noticed the water under the dinette. I vacumed as much as I could. Since this is my first sailboat, I need a lot of help with terminology, for example: Volcano? Thanks for all the good ideas on the cabin water problem. I will monitor this discussion.
Peter
South Daytona, Florida

Boat Name: (Working On A Name)

Model/Year: C-22, 1974

Hull No. 2679

Hailing Port: South Daytona, Florida
01/30/2007 1:21 PM Pacific Time

Hi Jay,

Regarding the Volcano, it's a term many use for what is actually a thru-hull. In this case the thru-hull for the cockpit drains and the thru-hull for the keel cable.

Peter
Cynthia
Victoria BC

Boat Name: Merlin

Model/Year: 22/81

Hull No. C YH0025M81D

Hailing Port: Sidney BC
06/22/2011 10:20 PM Pacific Time

I've had my '81 Catalina 22 for a couple of years now and the bilges are now bone dry. Under the dinette table floor is the low point of my boat, and a previous owner has put a teak-covered access port there presumably for pumping out water.

I had to have the Volcano ground off and replaced with a new through-hull. The original hardware was frozen with corrosion, leaked, and I didn't dare try to turn the valves for fear of having something break off in my hand and send us straight to the bottom. Every time we sailed, water would come up through the "shut" drain valves, come out the sink drain, and either slosh around on the galley floor or drain through the lockers into the bilge.

Second mystery source of water was from the cockpit drains. The "funnel" in the cockpit floor is built with a "double" drain pipe, so from under the stairs it might look fine and solid, but in reality be draining water straight into the bilges. Take off the cockpit-drain strainer, and have a good look at the edges of the drain. If the edges seem cracked or broken up, your cockpit is probably draining straight into the bilge, INSIDE the pipe you see from inside the boat, and OUTSIDE the pipe you see from outside the boat.
 
 
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