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Author PROVISIONING TIPS FOR C22 CRUISING
PHILIP & SHARON MERLIER
FELLSMERE, FLORIDA

Boat Name: SWIZZLE STICK

Model/Year: 1990 C22

Hull No.

Hailing Port: FELLSMERE, FLORIDA
11/11/2004 8:16 PM Pacific Time

I would like to start a new thread where people could provide helpful hints regarding the provisioning of a C22 for cruising.
Philip
PHILIP & SHARON MERLIER
FELLSMERE, FLORIDA

Boat Name: SWIZZLE STICK

Model/Year: 1990 C22

Hull No.

Hailing Port: FELLSMERE, FLORIDA
11/11/2004 8:33 PM Pacific Time

Hello:
When all you have is a cooler to keep things cold, the last thing that you want to have on board is milk that requires refrigeration. For many years we purchased the small boxes of Parmalat whole milk that does not require refrigeration but it does take up a significant amount of space if you are cruising for any length of time. The Parmalat whole milk actually tastes like regular milk. Then a few years ago we discovered NIDO (made by Nestle). It is a wonderful powdered WHOLE milk that comes in a can. It tastes great and is so rich that you can actually avoid adding butter or oil to some dishes that you cook with Nido because the Nido makes up for it. We use it in our coffee, the cooking of dishes that require milk, and it is good enough to drink by itself. We have found that it is better to reconstitute it in a small amount of water before adding it to anything. We purchase Nido at Walmart but it can also be found in Mexican groceries. It is a top quality product which takes up minimal space on board.
Philip & Sharon
Chip Lee
Utica, NY

Boat Name: Martha Pearl

Model/Year: 1980 C-22

Hull No. #9742

Hailing Port: Black River Bay, NY
11/12/2004 3:33 AM Pacific Time

Good idea, Philip. I also kayak-camp a bit in the Northeast, so I've borrowed a few tricks from those experiences:

Compression sacks for your bulky things like sleeping bags and clothes makes a lot more room for food and water. They are available in most canoe/kayak stores, and online at places like campmor.com.

Buy the smallest serving size you can find of everything. Small cans and packages will fit in nooks and crannies to get the most out of your storage spaces.

Freshwater sailors only - I use an MSR Waterworks water filter with a standard Nalgene-threaded outlet. Nalgene makes roll-up water containers that are small enough to fit in your pocket. I have heard that manual watermakers are available for saltwater use too. Having the ability to make your own potable water is a real spacer saver, not to mention a potential lifsaver.

Kayak shops also sell complete dehydrated meals, which could stretch your distance between provisioning stops. They are ok in general, and some are quite good, but a generally high on the carbs. I buy something like an Indian rice dish, and throw a small can of meat or some fresh fish in it to give it a little more protein.

This is a developed taste (I'm slightly diabetic), but instead of juice I pack Crystal Lite in tiny individual tubs instead of juice. I mix their Orange Sunshine flavor with their regular lemonade flavor and get something reminiscent of frozen orange juice.

Hope a little of this helps, Philip.

Chip Lee
david martin
hutchinson island fl

Boat Name: barefoot gourmet

Model/Year: cat 22 1977

Hull No. 7942 (?)

Hailing Port: Hutchinsom Island Fl
11/12/2004 1:59 PM Pacific Time

I prepare most of our meals in advance in correct portions and freeze in tupperware , I have a frozen cooler and a fridge cooler on the boat and open the frozen one as little as possible . I use the 12 volt coolers which help but they only drop the temperature about 15 from ambient . For storage I have installed doors ( about 10x12) in all side/bow lockers that made sense , although you can get water in them they still help the clutter . I also freeze gallon jugs of water before we go and use crystal lite tubs , various flavours . I have installed a 5gal bladder water tank under the galley with foot pump up to faucet on galley
PHILIP & SHARON MERLIER
FELLSMERE, FLORIDA

Boat Name: SWIZZLE STICK

Model/Year: 1990 C22

Hull No.

Hailing Port: FELLSMERE, FLORIDA
11/12/2004 7:15 PM Pacific Time

Water conservation tips: We only use our fresh water supply for drinking and cooking (we do not wash ourselves, brush our teeth, or wash our dishes with fresh water). We store our water in the five gallon tank that came with the boat and many one gallon plastic jugs that Arizona Ice Tea and Apple Juice originally came in. You would be surprised how many gallons of water can be hidden in little spaces around the boat. An added benefit to storing the water in gallon jugs is that you can monitor your supply and use better. Melted cooler water can also be recyled for drinking and porta potti use. When cooking, 1/3 of the water required can be sea water - then just don't bother to add salt to the dish.
Philip
PHILIP & SHARON MERLIER
FELLSMERE, FLORIDA

Boat Name: SWIZZLE STICK

Model/Year: 1990 C22

Hull No.

Hailing Port: FELLSMERE, FLORIDA
11/13/2004 8:11 PM Pacific Time

Items that do NOT require refrigeration: Eggs; Cheese; Squeeze margarine; Mustard; Pickles; and Hard Salami. Ketchup and other questionable items can be stored in the bottom of the boat where it is cooler. Individual foil packages of mayonnaise, ketchup, etc. eliminate the need to refrigerate these items. Fresh eggs (never refrigerated) bought directly from the source are said to last longer however we have had good luck with store bought eggs. Some people claim that if you turn the carton of eggs over each day that they last longer but we have seen no difference. If eggs are going to be kept for weeks then you should break each one by itself into a bowl to check it when you cook to prevent contamination of your whole dish that you are preparing. If you are going to stay out for weeks and weeks cheese can be wrapped in a cloth soaked in vinegar and sealed in a plastic box or zip lock bag. We had good luck doing that on our six week trip to the Bahamas.
Chip Lee
Utica, NY

Boat Name: Martha Pearl

Model/Year: 1980 C-22

Hull No. #9742

Hailing Port: Black River Bay, NY
11/14/2004 6:46 AM Pacific Time

Obviously, boats our size do not accommodate culinary delights every day. So we have used less-than-optimum ingredients to get the job done:

Spray cans of cheese spread do not require refrigeration and can satisfy a craving for the taste, if you're not too particular.

Small cans of tomato paste can be used for making ketchup, chili, spaghetti sauce, etc. Not my favorite, but beats eating canned tuna and peanut butter and jelly for 6 days.

We pass on the fresh bread, and pack Scandanavian crisp bread instead. Ryvita is our favorite.

We also pack flour tortillas or Lebanese flatbread, neither of which require refrigeration. You can mash chick peas with some olive oil, lemon juice and garlic to make your own fresh hummus with no refrigeration as well. Chick peas (Chi-chi beans) come in very small cans, or you can reconstitute dried peas of you have the patience - we don't.

We bring some wine, but only one liquor, rum. Then we can have run-and-tonic, rum-and-coke or daquiris, which are just as fun as margheritas!

Canned chicken and bagged salmon are versatile new additions to our provisions.

You can buy several kinds of dried chilis and mushrooms now, which are great for variety. Buy big packages for the house, and repack in small containers for the trip. They reconstitute in water in about 15 minutes, and the remaining water can be used to flavor the dish. Great for dressing up freeze-dried eggs.

We like mexican food, so we always have a couple small cans of diced tomatoes with green chilis. We make these into salsa, chili, enchilada sauce, etc.

Chip Lee
Larry
Greenville, SC

Boat Name: Kemo Sabe

Model/Year: C-22 , 1973

Hull No. 2229

Hailing Port: www.keoweesailingclub.com
11/14/2004 11:47 AM Pacific Time

I leave any non-essential interior cushions home. Too much problem 'surfing' under them to find stuff. I don't care how organized you are, you still look for 'stuff' different places and the cushions are hard to drag here and there inside. If two go cruising on my boat, I leave the starboard quarterberth cushions; single handedly sailing, I leave those and vee-berth cushions home.

Also, remove the screws from the port settee backrest so you can get into the lazerette under the cockpit from the interior. It's easy to remove that and reach for items you desire and then replace the backrest. Sometimes I only take the cushions for the backrest and when sleeping, my ankles hang over that space when I stretch out on the dinette berth.

Red wine doesn't require ice, nor do sodas in cooler parts of the year, so you can stay out in the boondocks longer rather than find a marina daily.

Larry
PHILIP & SHARON MERLIER
FELLSMERE, FLORIDA

Boat Name: SWIZZLE STICK

Model/Year: 1990 C22

Hull No.

Hailing Port: FELLSMERE, FLORIDA
11/14/2004 8:03 PM Pacific Time

So what do we put in our cooler? Actually as little as possible. Our daily fresh meat supply and frozen juice concentrate is all we refrigerate. We have kept frozen juice concentrate up to nine days and it appeared that it would have lasted longer. We pack fresh meat for at least one meal for each day that we are out. We pack hamburger, chicken, lamb, beef, and sometimes hot dogs. We have provisioned for up to two weeks of meat in our cooler. To prevent the more perishable things from going bad we eat our meat in the order listed above. All meat is divided into meal portions and repackaged in gallon size Freezer Ziplock Bags. Then it is all double bagged again in Freezer Ziplock bags with two or three meals to a bag. Using a marker the contents of the bag are written on the opening edge of the outside bag. This edge is always kept elevated when we pack the cooler so that we can easily find it while minimally disturbing the contents of the cooler. Each of these bags of meat is made as flat as possible and frozen solid before departure. The large size frozen juice concentrates are also double bagged (three to a gallon bag standing up). Be sure to suck all the air out of the bags before sealing. We put block ice across the bottom of our cooler and then the food goes on top (that way the food it not sitting in the melted ice water) with the edges sticking up for identification and access. What little space is left around the packages is filled in with chunk ice. When we remove an item we just unzip the outside bag without removing it from its ice bed and pull out what we need and reseal it. We cover our coolers with at least three fluffy towel and usually a fleece blanket or pillow also. We have found that this extends the life of the ice significantly.
Philip & Sharon Merlier

Chip Lee
Utica, NY

Boat Name: Martha Pearl

Model/Year: 1980 C-22

Hull No. #9742

Hailing Port: Black River Bay, NY
11/15/2004 4:47 AM Pacific Time

Here's a controversial item: Who makes the best coolers?

I have both Igloo and Coleman coolers, both tall and conventional designs. In the tall kind, the Igloo with the hinged lid seems to keep cold longer than the Coleman tall cooler with the removable lid. I don't understand this, because the removable lid is so much thicker.

On the other hand, my Coleman conventional shape is much better than my Igloo conventional. Has anyone found an outstanding cooler model that fits well in a C22?

Chip Lee
PHILIP & SHARON MERLIER
FELLSMERE, FLORIDA

Boat Name: SWIZZLE STICK

Model/Year: 1990 C22

Hull No.

Hailing Port: FELLSMERE, FLORIDA
11/15/2004 10:50 PM Pacific Time

Wine storage: We rarely drink any beverages on our cruises that require refrigeration. However, we have not yet gained an appreciation for warm beer. And we don't usually drink any hard alcohol except when we need some antifreeze in very cold situations. So that basically leaves wine which never requires refrigeration and requires no mixers. We have found that putting the bottles in thick socks is the best way to pad the bottles when packing them. If we are in a cold water climate and want chilled wine we just put a bottle in a mesh bag and hang it over the side for a while. Some of the Gulf Coast cruisers recommend the wine that comes in plactic bags in a box is good for packing on a C22.
Philip & Sharon
PHILIP & SHARON MERLIER
FELLSMERE, FLORIDA

Boat Name: SWIZZLE STICK

Model/Year: 1990 C22

Hull No.

Hailing Port: FELLSMERE, FLORIDA
11/20/2004 6:35 AM Pacific Time

Bread Supply: We have had good luck storing bread for up to two weeks, sometimes longer. When purchased we never put our bread in the refrigerator at home or allow it to get in the sun --- that way it never gets condensation inside the bags. On the boat we store our bread in an opaque, covered, and ventilated plastic box. We have had the best luck with the Arnold brand breads that are double wrapped. We also always buy the whole wheat or multiple grain breads and rolls === they seem to last longer === possibly due to the lower sugar content in the bread. On occasion we have taken dry bagels as they make a quick breakfast however we find that they are usually short lived due to mold. If the bread supply runs out crackers can be substitued and they last forever. Also biscuits and flat breads can be easily made in a fry pan when the need arises. Also while in the Bahamas we found that we could make Skillet Cakes and Pizza in the fry pan for special occasions.
Philip & Sharon
Chip Ford
Marblehead, MA

Boat Name: Chip Ahoy

Model/Year: 1974-Swing Keel

Hull No. CTY032820374

Hailing Port: Marblehead, Mass.
11/21/2004 3:18 AM Pacific Time


Like anonymous above, before I departed on my 3-week cruise up the Maine coast this summer, I removed the v-berth cushions from Chip Ahoy and left them home as they were only in the way. This gave me some 4" more height up there and I could also easily access the two compartments in the v-berth. (I stow my anchor rode and chain in the forward one; in the more-aft locker my battery charger in a watertight plastic box, shore-power cable, water hose, spare main sail and jib, and other odds and ends in the aft compartment and further back beneath starboard quarterberth -- which also becomes accessible further aft through the cabin compartment.)

Since I sailed to Maine singlehanded and do almost all of my sailing solo, I lowered the dinette table and "permanently" installed its center cushion. I left it down for the trip (in fact it's still down) but removed the settee seatback cushions. Not only did this let me stretch out my 6' frame but, as anonymous noted, it provides easy access through the port-aft settee drop-down hatch I built into the cabin last spring. I'd hardly ever squeezed behind the table anyway.
[See: http://chipford.com/chip_ahoy_7.htm]

I found this setup to be fuctional as well, as I could still use the portside wide "bunk" as a low table during the day with the starboard quarterberth as my seat. The "permanent" space beneath the table provided more storage room.

Last year I removed the plastic "galley" sink as it took up too much space for little reason. I brought along two 5-gallon collapsible jugs of fresh water (and a couple gallons of bottled water stowed beneath the dinette table) instead. Over the three-week cruise I emptied one of the 5 gallon jugs, collapsed it, and stowed it out of the way. I kept the alcohol stove for cooking, stowed in the space where the galley used to slide away into, beneath the starboard cockpit. I also have a large, rather flat (8" high) water-tight plastic box there for storing foodstuffs, easily accessible. My tiller-pilot gets stored on top of it when not in use, along with my radar reflector.

I never found a more convenient location for the cooler but between the compression post and the starboard quarterberth as far forward as possible, but such is life in a confined space.

For a more complete description of how I use space aboard Chip Ahoy, see "Living Aboard a C-22" at:
http://chipford.com/living_aboard.htm

Chip Ford --
Marblehead, Mass.
1974 C22 Swing Keel #3282 - "Chip Ahoy"
Chip Ahoy website:www.chipford.com
PHILIP & SHARON MERLIER
FELLSMERE, FLORIDA

Boat Name: SWIZZLE STICK

Model/Year: 1990 C22

Hull No.

Hailing Port: FELLSMERE, FLORIDA
11/21/2004 6:31 AM Pacific Time

Reference book: "The Cruising Cook" by Shirley Herd is a good reference book. It is published by: S. Deal & Associates 1629 Guizot Street San Diego, Ca 92107
Philip & Sharon
Fred Apstein
Gabriola Is BC

Boat Name: Scruples

Model/Year: 1976

Hull No. 95

Hailing Port: Gabriola Is BC
11/21/2004 10:43 AM Pacific Time

I lived aboard for almost 30 years with no refrigeration or cooler. Not on a C22, but most of my boats were 30' and under.

I'm not much of a milk drinker, but for guests I kept small cans of evaporated milk.

For meat, fish and chicken, I found that vinegar diluted by half and one or two tablespoons of mixed pickleing spices would keep them for up to a week. Chicken may only keep a couple of days if the weather is hot. Fish, if cut less than two inches thick, will pickle nicely and keep for months.

You have to shake or stir the stuff daily to get vinegar on all surfaces, except after a week or so the fish won't need much attention.

The flavour is suprisingly mild. It tastes marinated. If you use the meat or chicken in a stew, the flavour spreads out to the potatoes and carrots and it's quite good.

Potatoes, carrots, onions, and cabbage will keep for a month or more, especially if you wrap them individually in newspaper and put them in a dark, dry place. Plastic containers work great for this.

Dry sausage like pepperoni and salami keep a long time. If you wipe them with a paper towel moistened with oil and vinegar, they keep almost forever.

A bit of sausage and a can of mushroom soup tastes pretty good on pasta when supplies are low. Cook the sausage with oil and onions first, and it's a gourmet treat.

Dried minced garlic keeps for years. It tastes better (I think) than garlic salt or garlic powder.

If you keep whole grains like brown rice or wheatberries, be sure to open the containers once every six months or so. They need to breath a bit.
david martin
hutchinson island fl

Boat Name: barefoot gourmet

Model/Year: cat 22 1977

Hull No. 7942 (?)

Hailing Port: Hutchinsom Island Fl
11/22/2004 6:04 AM Pacific Time

For bread we use pitta bread and freeze it before leaving then keep as cold as possible (fridge not freezer) we make pittas stuffed with canned tuna which we doctor up with chopped sweet onions and celery (pre chopped and in tupperware they keep for several weeks) and one of the dressing/marinades we sell in the store we do these these as we sail , easy to prepare and less mess than conventional sandwiches . We always try to eat hot in the evening , the dried potatoes are excellent with meat/fish and canned veggies( I always wash them in fresh water to try to get rid of the salt.) .On recommends of the gulf cruise we use the boxed wine - excellent and easy to stow on this subject we never drink any alcohol under way I have seen so many problems with this on other boats in the 45 years I have been ocean sailing
Larry
Greenville, SC

Boat Name: Kemo Sabe

Model/Year: C-22 , 1973

Hull No. 2229

Hailing Port: www.keoweesailingclub.com
11/22/2004 5:16 PM Pacific Time

Don't forget to take along the Chamois cloth. It is about the most handy, all-purpose cloth there is. Dry off the dew in the mornings or whatever. Dry off anything, wash anything and stores in its own tube. Won't ever go bad and if it dries out, just rewet it and it's good to go. Most of the cotton/ or wash clothes don't dry particularly and you can replace many 'floating towels'.

Larry
C-22 #2229
Kemo Sabe
R. C. Luiken
Milford, DE

Boat Name: Ricochet

Model/Year: C-22 Swing Keel/1986

Hull No. 13560

Hailing Port: Milford, DE/St. Michaels, MD
11/23/2004 5:54 AM Pacific Time

This is a great thread. I take exception to the sacrifice of culinary delights. I am in the process of putting a cookbook "Nobody Starves, a guide for cooking well in small places" with the idea of putting that myth to bed.

Periodically, I will post a recipe from the book. Since I cannot attach a recipe. Most recipes are one or two pot dishes. As an example of some of the main dishes I have done on Ricochet; Scallops primavera over linguine alfredo, chorizo stuffed pork tenderloin. My friends' lunch favorites are grilled ruebens and crab quesadillas.

I freeze all meats prior to provisioning the boat. Menus are planned so that the items that spoil the quickest are used first. I use an Igloo super cooler for frozen items and the regular Coleman step/cooler for refrigerated items. I have done up to 8 days with two other people with 1 marina stop for ice, water and cleaning out the porta potti

I cruise a lot with friends who have much bigger boats: C&C 35, Morgan 38 and Hinckley 43. By the time I arrive cocktails and hors d'ouvers are ready. Then it is my time to work culinary magic.

Look forward to reading more of your posts.
Chip Lee
Utica, NY

Boat Name: Martha Pearl

Model/Year: 1980 C-22

Hull No. #9742

Hailing Port: Black River Bay, NY
11/23/2004 9:01 AM Pacific Time

Hi R.C. - Didn't mean to imply that all culinary delights are lost when you go to sea. When we know we're going to be in a place long enough to do dishes and make the meal the centerpiece of the day, we certainly do it.

When we're moving on every night, though, I often go for simpler meals, less fuss.

Because we love fish and seafood, we often do Biryani rice with whatever's available or caught. Seafood enchildas are also a favorite of my wife, who spent a year of her childhood in Mexico.

Thai curries are wonderfully quick and easy meals on the boat. You can get all of the fixings except for the fish in non-refrigerated form. But even canned shrimp will work so the meal is totally non-refrigerated, if you want.

My Dad did a dish when I was young, and he and I had sailed to a very small island village in Ontario:

Saute and drain fresh pork chops, then add a drained can each of small potatoes, mushrooms and onions, one can of mushroom soup,a few tablespoons of sherry and enough water to thin the soup to gravy consistency. He did this in 10 minutes from what we had on the boat, plus the pork chops from the general store. It was great, impromptu, and has been a family boat dish ever since! Obviously, any meat will work in it.

If you want some recipes, I can give you some.

Chip Lee
Dick Reynolds
Lebanon, Oregon

Boat Name: Catnip

Model/Year: Swing Keel / 1974

Hull No. 4570

Hailing Port: Newport, Oregon
11/23/2004 9:32 PM Pacific Time

This is a great thread. Two things that I have not seen mentioned are 1. A new breed of ice chest that advertises that ice will last a week. My son bought one and used it on a desert campout last summer. He was impressed. 2. When we camped years ago we would take two ice chests along. one for meats with a couple slabs of newspaper wrapped dry ice and the other one with ice for other stuff. You do have to remember to take the nights meat out to thaw in the morning as it is really frozen hard.
R. C. Luiken
Milford, DE

Boat Name: Ricochet

Model/Year: C-22 Swing Keel/1986

Hull No. 13560

Hailing Port: Milford, DE/St. Michaels, MD
11/28/2004 7:06 PM Pacific Time

Chip; I di not take any offense at your comment. My friends have encouraged me to write the cookbook and I guess I'm just a little over enthused about it. The dishes you mentioned sound like great additions to my bag of tricks and the book. If you'd like to send them to me at [email protected]

Here's a breakfast favorite.

Add 2 Tablespoons of cream cheese to each serving of scrambled eggs about 2 minutes before serving.
Chip Lee
Utica, NY

Boat Name: Martha Pearl

Model/Year: 1980 C-22

Hull No. #9742

Hailing Port: Black River Bay, NY
12/11/2004 5:42 AM Pacific Time

Dick Reynolds: Can you get the brand of cooler from your son? I'd like to buy a good one that I could put second-week food in and have it last until the second week.

RC: sorry I didn't get back to you. Traveling too much to think right now. I'll try to get you some recipes over the holiday. You know how it is- you make something, it turns out well, you didn't write anything down....LOL

Chip Lee
Dick Reynolds
Lebanon, Oregon

Boat Name: Catnip

Model/Year: Swing Keel / 1974

Hull No. 4570

Hailing Port: Newport, Oregon
12/12/2004 6:44 PM Pacific Time

Hi. It's a Coleman extreme. He says they come in 5 day and seven day versions in various sizes. He is really happy with it. Hope this helps.
Karl Mielenhausen
New Bern, NC

Boat Name: Impromptu

Model/Year: C22 1985

Hull No. 13021

Hailing Port: Northwest Creek Marina
12/13/2004 4:25 AM Pacific Time

More info on the Coleman Xtreme coolers can be found at http://www.coleman.com/coleman/ColemanCom/subcategory.asp?CategoryID=8580&SourcePage=category_main.asp

Walmart lists the 70 qt version for about $25.

Coleman recommends .75 lb of ice per 1 qt of capacity or a whopping 52 lbs for this cooler to last the 5 days. Plus pre-chilling the contents.
Ken Palmer
Franklin, TN.

Boat Name: "Last Penny"

Model/Year: 1981

Hull No. 10475

Hailing Port: PPYC
12/13/2004 6:33 AM Pacific Time

Does that make it a 9.5 qt. cooler ?

Dick Reynolds
Lebanon, Oregon

Boat Name: Catnip

Model/Year: Swing Keel / 1974

Hull No. 4570

Hailing Port: Newport, Oregon
12/13/2004 11:19 PM Pacific Time

I guess that depends on the volume that 3/4 pound of ice takes up. If you really wish to get away for long periods you might rethink the above suggestion using dry ice in one ice chest. we really did this. We used a cheap foam ice chest as we didn't know what plastic would do when subjected to such cold temperatures (be brittle?). At the end of 6 days, the dry ice had evaporated but the whole chicken still in there was as hard as a rock. While the dry ice remained you could also refreeze bottles of water. When we did this about 35 years ago, dry ice wasn't very expensive but today it might be out of sight.
Chip Lee
Utica, NY

Boat Name: Martha Pearl

Model/Year: 1980 C-22

Hull No. #9742

Hailing Port: Black River Bay, NY
12/14/2004 4:47 AM Pacific Time

Thanks, Dick and Karl. I wasn't watching the list for a couple of days. Got caught up in the new site Chip Ford started. Now I'm glad for this format. Only get one e-mail a day, and all the replies are on one page.

Thanks again, I'll go look at the Extremes.

Chip Lee
Dick Reynolds
Lebanon, Oregon

Boat Name: Catnip

Model/Year: Swing Keel / 1974

Hull No. 4570

Hailing Port: Newport, Oregon
12/17/2004 6:52 PM Pacific Time

One other thing that no one has mentioned is that Chicken of the Sea has added clams, shrimp, and scallops to their products that come in foil packets that do not need refrigeration. That, along with tuna which they have had for a while and chicken which another manufacturer has gives a few more choices for the cruiser. Now if we could only find steak in a foil pack....
Larry
Greenville, SC

Boat Name: Kemo Sabe

Model/Year: C-22 , 1973

Hull No. 2229

Hailing Port: www.keoweesailingclub.com
12/17/2004 7:42 PM Pacific Time

No sailor has mentioned sardines in aluminum cans. I always take some sardines in Lousiana Hot sauce and saltine crackers. Did I tell you that I single hand cruise quite often? :)

Another fine meal is that boil bag rice. It cooks quickly and the left over hot water is good to wash the dishes on the first wash. Also, you have to have someting on the rice. I like to take Dinty Moore Beef stew and cook a can, then pour over the rice. It's great and a good HOT meal after a long day. Sometimes the beef stew is good hot and poured over bread. It's actually good over any canned item which one happens to retrive from the bilge, especially if it has been a long, grueling day! If it has been a long hard day, a jar of peanuts in a plastic jar with some apples will keep you going until you can cook or until you feel secure letting "Melvin" the autopilot do his job.

In the mornings, I like pancakes cooked in fried Spam drippings. If you fry the Spam really well-done and crisp, it is 'like bacon' on the pancakes and the left over Spam can be used for sandwiches at lunch. Nothing like good Spam (fried out hard) and lettuce and tomatoes with Duke's Mayonnaise! (Nope, no mayo as it has to be refrigerated.)

Another thing that is good to cook is onions and potatoes. They last a long time raw. I took ten pounds of onions and 20 lbs of potatoes when I went to The Abacos. (Sardines, too.) Nothing like smelling some good onions frying up in a frying pan after frying some potatoes nice and dark, peeling and all. The onion scent drifts downwind, so make sure not to anchor upwind of people as they all come see what is for dinner. And, if you're really hungry, pour a can of field peas in on top of the onions and potatoes. Pour lots of ketchup (doesn't need refrigeration nor does mustard) or Texas Pete or Maurice Bessenger's Barbecue Sauce (no refrigeration) all over the concoction and you've got a good meal and it'll stick to your ribs. It's also good for "boatlock" and lack of wind.

Be sure to anchor upwind of me, but if you see me in heavy weather, I'll always be using my 18 lb Danforth with 15' of 5/8 galvanized chain. So, don't worry, I won't drag down on you if you are downwind. Sometimes I grunt hard when I hoist that heavy chain/anchor, however.

See you on the water, maybe!
Larry
Harald Thannhauser
Calgary, AB Canada

Boat Name:

Model/Year: C22 1979

Hull No. 8266

Hailing Port: Glenmore
03/06/2005 10:10 PM Pacific Time

I have a 70's C22 with the fiberglass pull-out dinette. The stove doesn't work, the sink can't drain when the boat is moored and the 'storage' space leaves a lot to be desired. I'm wondering if any of you have done a done a 'rebuild' of this area or seen any good ones done.

Harald
Jan P.
Grapevine, TX

Boat Name: Being Time

Model/Year: 1974 C22 Poptop/swing keel

Hull No. 4244

Hailing Port: Grapevine
11/13/2005 7:15 AM Pacific Time

I haven't done more than a weekend on the boat, but here are my cooler tips: Block ice stays much longer than cubes. I freeze water bottles - then I can drink the water when the ice is gone. You can also make block ice with margarine tubs, etc.

Put aluminum foil over the top. There's a product that is advertised in the back of sailing magazines that provides additional insulation. I am thinking of trying something similar by cutting down those foil covered window shades for the windshield in the cars. That would be longer lasting than the foil. The foil trick really does help, my mom has been doing it for years on long trips. Keep the cooler in the shade (keep a small one in the cockpit for drinks if you want), and you can wrap your sleeping bags around it for more insulation.

Freeze everything you can. Keep meal/food in one cooler and drinks in another. That way the food one is not gotten into as much as the other. The less you open it the cooler it will stay.

For a weekend deal, I bought steaks, marinated in Italian dressing overnight, then frozen. I froze the red wine in a bag and put it in the cooler, too. Pre chill the cooler with ice water. I set them out an hour or so to thaw before we planned dinner on Saturday night and they were still frozen partially when we got to the island to cook out.

The box wines are great to take with you, just take them out of the box. I like the chillable red. It's less glass in the boat, even if they aren't the finest of wines. You can freeze them, too, to keep them longer, and have some additional useful ice in the cooler.

I'm excited about the new packaging for the tuna. They now have filets, too. So much less bulk and weight.

I like evaporated milk, but sanalac is a pretty good dry milk. Also, there are some pretty good soy milks out now, too that last a lot longer than regular milk.

There's a cookbook that's not in print, but the writers were adventurers and had some great ideas in it. They spent a summer on a sailboat, living very minimally. It's called "The On and Off the Road Cookbook". You should be able to get it through your library.
PHILIP & SHARON MERLIER
FELLSMERE, FLORIDA

Boat Name: SWIZZLE STICK

Model/Year: 1990 C22

Hull No.

Hailing Port: FELLSMERE, FLORIDA
12/19/2005 6:31 AM Pacific Time

Hello:
We just got back from our annual meat hunting trip where we realized something which we hope will be very useful in our cruising lifestyle.
For years we have packed our fresh meat in heavy duty freezer zip lock bags and then sucked the air out of them. We then double bag it since often ice water gets in or meat juice leaks out. Then after labeling we freeze the individual packages solid. We also bag our frozen juice concentrate to minimize the chance of mess.
This year we were introduced to home vacuum packing machines. They work Very well!!! We plan to switch to this method whenever our trips originate from home. We will still use the zip locks when out cruising for extended times.
We found that if you want to take preformed hamburgers they must be frozen first on wax paper on a cookie sheet. Then vacuum bag them. Otherwise they get sucked flat.
Perhaps everyone has been vacuum packaging for years but this was new and exciting to us so we had to tell you about it.
Happy sailing.
 
 
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