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Catalina Direct Discussion Topics / Catalina 22 Discussion Area / Cabin / Gasoline Fumes
 
 
Author Gasoline Fumes
Chuck Bennett
Dothan, Alabama

Boat Name: Mya Scape

Model/Year: C-22SK 1982

Hull No. 10592

Hailing Port: Bagby Marina, Lake Eufaula, Ft. Gaines, Georgia
04/29/2004 4:51 PM Pacific Time

I have gasoline fumes in the cabin of my boat. Does everyone with an outboard have this problem? If not, how did you prevent it?
Vic
Indianapolis, Indiana

Boat Name: Summer Zamboni

Model/Year: 1985?

Hull No. 13100

Hailing Port: Geist Marina, Indianapolis
04/29/2004 5:11 PM Pacific Time

The only time that I had gas fumes in the cabin was when my brother spilled the gas container in the port, rear locker. My suggestion is to keep the gas container well closed when being stored. Mine, for example, has a vented cap that I have left open on occasion.

When underway, my gas container is placed on the deck next to the transom, as the lid for the port rear locker pinches the fuel line. Hope that this helps.

Vic Summer Zamboni #13100
David J. Pierce
Sunset, Louisiana

Boat Name: Little Miracles

Model/Year: 1985

Hull No. 12822

Hailing Port: Cypermort Point, Louisiana
04/30/2004 9:30 AM Pacific Time

The last time I had gasoline fumes in the cabin I forgot to close the vent on the top of the tank cap.
Chip Lee
Utica, NY

Boat Name: Martha Pearl

Model/Year: 1980 C-22

Hull No. #9742

Hailing Port: Black River Bay, NY
04/30/2004 10:10 AM Pacific Time

I started with an older tank that seemed to vent even if the vent was closed. Anyway, I'm more nervous than most about below-decks fuel, since I saw a couple bad fires when I was a kid.

So I got a funny shaped plastic 6 gal from West Marine that fits neatly on the cockpit floor with no real loss of leg room for the way I normally sit. Leaves about 1/2" of room on either side and slides up tight against the transom.

Cost about $30.
Vic
Indianapolis, Indiana

Boat Name: Summer Zamboni

Model/Year: 1985?

Hull No. 13100

Hailing Port: Geist Marina, Indianapolis
04/30/2004 11:26 AM Pacific Time

You can get one of those funny shaped, 6 gallon containers at any Wal Mart and many hardware stores for lots less than $30.00.
Chuck Bennett
Dothan, Alabama

Boat Name: Mya Scape

Model/Year: C-22SK 1982

Hull No. 10592

Hailing Port: Bagby Marina, Lake Eufaula, Ft. Gaines, Georgia
05/01/2004 5:48 AM Pacific Time

Thanks for the suggestions, but I perfer to keep the tank in the portside rear locker. Has anyone made a hose connection that would vent the tank to the outside of the boat? Has anyone ever partioned off the tank storage area with fiberglass or other material?
Paul Brook
Fairfield, IA

Boat Name: Selkie

Model/Year: C22 Fin 1977

Hull No. 7817

Hailing Port: Lake Rathbun, IA
05/01/2004 8:19 AM Pacific Time

The tank should have three openings: The filler cap, the supply line, and an exhaust line (for gas fumes). The last should be fitted with a hose and connected to a through-hull on the transom. My understanding is that the exhaust line is a coast guard requirement. Maybe it isn't but I never have problems with gas fumes.

Also, never fill the tank while it is in the boat. Put it on the dock first.



Boat Name:

Model/Year:

Hull No.

Hailing Port:
05/01/2004 9:00 PM Pacific Time

There is another solution to the fumes problem. Get a late model C22. If I had an old style boat I think I would try to seal the area from the cabin and add large vents.
Bob Vick
Caldwell, TX

Boat Name: Over Keel

Model/Year: <1985

Hull No. 13059

Hailing Port: Lake Somerville
05/02/2004 7:40 AM Pacific Time

I put a small cooler in my fuel locker & ran one cowling vent hose on to a 2 or 3-inch pipe I installed thru the side of the cooler. I also installed a fuel line bulkhead connector thru the side, so the lid can close. This cooler was large enough so I have room to store extra oil, grease, & other messy things along with the fuel. I cannot remember the size of the cooler, however the fuel tank fits nicely in one end. I put two coolers of this size in behind the wide opening side hinged dinette seat, it seems I had to remove the lids & hinges from the cooler to get them thru the hole. One was left behind dinette seat for cold storage. It seems like 20 qt was the size, but I am not sure. I used a professional bungee cord to keep the lid in place without the hinges, which were workable, but hard to use.

No fumes, containment from spillage are the benefits of this system. I do like the single external vent line; I have not seen factory tanks designed this way, however know many have retrofitted this way.

Bob Vick
Caldwell, TX
C 22 #13059
Over Keel

Paul Moore
Doylestown, PA

Boat Name:

Model/Year:

Hull No.

Hailing Port:
05/08/2004 10:49 AM Pacific Time

Before I got down tot he cooler idea, I was reading the other commetns and thinking that one of those plastic storage containers with a tight fitting lid would work well. There a re a wide variety of sizes of these.
Then attach two vent hoses to the lid and feed the fuel line into it and that should help.
I'll let you know how it goes.
In addition to the gas fumes I did not like that large area in the port locker not really being usable because the fuel was in there.




Boat Name:

Model/Year:

Hull No.

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05/28/2004 5:01 PM Pacific Time

Read and understand Baynard open my eyes!
Bob:

Since you have a new OB and tank, I am sure you will find that the tank does
not vent out. It will vent in, but not out. My 1996 model three gallon
Evinrude tank is that way.

This is due to EPA regulations controlling the dispersal of unburned hydro
carbons (read gasoline) into the atmosphere.

This is similar to your automobile's gas tank cap which does not vent out,
although it can go through a charcoal filter that lets out air without hydro
carbons. But let's not draw too many analogies here, as your car's fuel delivery
system with fuel injection and fuel return to the tank is a different system
than the fuel delivery system of your outboard.

You will find that there is considerable room above the fill level on your
tank for air that will compress as the gasoline expands. New tanks are designed
for this purpose. When you remove the cap for filling the tank, you will
hear a slight hiss as air that has built up in the tank rushes out. Yea, this
does momentarily defeat the purpose of the absence of outward venting, but I
guess the EPA has to relinquish a bit for reality.

If you are experiencing fumes, I suspect that either a fuel line connection
or your tank cap or maybe both are either faulty or maybe just not properly
attached. I think you should check with your OB dealer about this.

You may also be getting some fumes from the fuel line connection that
attaches to your engine when you remove it from your engine and store it inside with
the tank. Note that the spring compressing a ball against the opening of the
connection could be faulty or tired and fuel may be dripping out of this end
of the fuel line. This happened to me in the beginning of this season,
however, it is easy to repair this connection with a new one.

Unless you have done so already, I think it would be wiser to look into the
things I mentioned before you go building a special box. Simple solutions are
always better.

Nevertheless, may you have many good days on the water.

Bayard Gross
C-22 #9911
Baby Blue
Greenwich, CT
Randy Carie
West Lafayette, IN

Boat Name: Randa Sue

Model/Year: C22/1981

Hull No. 10317

Hailing Port: Lafayette Sailing Club
01/04/2009 8:36 AM Pacific Time

Chuck,

I had the same problem with my 1981, C22, #10317. I solved my problem by making a compartment for my three gallon gas can. I purchased a large plastic storage box with lid. Shop wise. Find a box that has a lid that will seal well, this is important. Go through the cabin, behind the port settee, to gain access to the port compartment. Secure the plastic box to the platform, with short stainless sheet metal screws, washers, and silicone caulking. Use shims as necessary to keep things level. WATCH THE LENGTH OF YOUR DRILL BIT. The hull of the C22 will be close. My C22 has the two clam shell vents on the port side, so I cut the Vinyl Ventilator Hose, and directed it to the matching holes that I cut into the plastic box. The flexible tubing was then sealed into the plastic box with sticky back foam. I also had to place the sticky back foam on the lid to ensure a tight fit. I should also mention that my lid has latches on it, this helps keep the lid tightly sealed. For the hose; I directed it through the most aft clam shell vent thru the Vinyl Ventilator Hose and into the plastic box. The primer bulb is outside of the boat, close to the motor for easy access.
I will add that the lid for the plastic box also served a second purpose for me. I fastened Deck Anchor Chocks to the lid and now have a very secure spot to store my small Danforth anchor. Measure twice, cut once!

Happy Sailing,
Randy Carie
Lafayette Sailing Club
C22, #10317
Larry Wilson
Phoenix, AZ

Boat Name: Second Wind

Model/Year: SK 1982

Hull No. 11152

Hailing Port:
01/04/2009 7:46 PM Pacific Time

Randy,
I am having the same problem with my '82 C22. I've only had this boat out twice since purchasing it in Sept, and smelled gas both times. I see a few places on my old Tempo 6 gal tank and hoses that might be leak sources on mine. I might just try a new tank and fuel line assembly (Johnson fittings) first before I build a box.

I don't believe any of the mechanical vents on the typical High Density Polyethylene tanks prevent out - breathing, so it seems there has to be some vapors that escape.

One question, did you also port the forward clamshell vent into your fuel tank "box" to get fresh air flowing through?

What tanks are others having good luck with?

Larry Wilson
Second Wind
Phoenix, AZ
#11152 SK
Randy Carie
West Lafayette, IN

Boat Name: Randa Sue

Model/Year: C22/1981

Hull No. 10317

Hailing Port: Lafayette Sailing Club
01/04/2009 9:06 PM Pacific Time

Larry,

Yes, I did. I'm very pleased with the results.

Randy
Greg Guenther
Belleville, IL

Boat Name: Magnificat

Model/Year: 1970

Hull No. 473

Hailing Port: Belleville, IL
01/05/2009 5:58 AM Pacific Time

Hey guys,

If you are storing fuel below decks, there are very specific Coast Guard regulations on ventilation that must be observed. You can probably find the specific regs at the CG website or the CG auxiliary site. Basically they require two vents, one facing forward that opens into the area that the fuel is stored in to force air into the compartment and another rearward facing vent that has a hose that reaches into the lowest part of the compartment because gasoline fumes are heavier than air. The theory, and this is mostly geared towards powerboats, is that the air pressure will increase from the forward vent and force the fumes out the rear vent. If you get stopped for an inspection and don't have the proper ventilation you could be fined.

I think that the overriding concern here is safety and I can't argue with the CG on that basis.

I can't wait for winter to be over and get back on the water.

Good sailing!

Greg



Boat Name:

Model/Year:

Hull No.

Hailing Port:
01/06/2009 7:00 AM Pacific Time

Hi All,

I have an old style 22 with the fuel tank in the big portside locker. It is vented with the vents as described in the previous posts, and this has worked well to keep fumes out of the boat. We have even had some slight spillage from the tank going on its side when we heel over, and the fumes clear quickly.

tom
Quixotic #7555
don
eastsound wa

Boat Name: nibblet

Model/Year: 22 / 78

Hull No.

Hailing Port: eastsound wa
01/08/2009 7:27 PM Pacific Time

i too have had the problem gas fumes, the vent on most tempo/ plastic tanks vent to the outside world. i fixed the problem by unscrewing the vent fitting and installing a hose barb fitting then i add a fuel tank vent thu hull on deck (stern) then added fuel hose between two barbs i got a extra fuel cap when i need to take the tank off the boat. that worked like a charm but i wanted more fuel so i found a inboard plastic 12 gal tank that i mounted on center under the cockpit floor.
Larry Wilson
Phoenix, AZ

Boat Name: no name

Model/Year: C22/1982

Hull No. 11152

Hailing Port: Lake Pleasant, AZ
01/12/2009 9:38 PM Pacific Time

Most C-22 I see pass the fuel line and battery cable through the aft vent cowling into the port locker. Since the aft vent is the exhaust, as Greg mentions, it should have a long hose extending into the lowest part of the bilge to properly vent the heavier than air gas fumes. Since I trailer my boat each time I sail, I have to fish the fuel and electric lines through this long hose each time. A real chore, not to mention it obstructs the vent. Anybody come up with a good alternative to this?

I saw a photo of one that put an open passthrough hole from the transom into the locker, located up high. http://www.elmhurstprop.com/kitty/External%20images/crw_2942.htm


Larry
Lynn Buchanan
Nevada City, CA

Boat Name: SAILYNN

Model/Year: SWING 1984

Hull No. 11994

Hailing Port: SCOTTS FLAT LAKE, CA
01/14/2009 9:30 PM Pacific Time

you could try tying a very small line around the hose and electric plug that is long enough to tie around the stern cleat when you disconnect the hose and electric plug. this would allow the two to be quickly pulled out of the cowling.
Robert Donehoo
Duluth Ga

Boat Name: Shady Deal

Model/Year: Catalina 22 1979

Hull No. 8940

Hailing Port: Lake Lanier Ga
01/15/2009 6:53 AM Pacific Time

I got this idea from several other cruisers on the Northern Gulf Coast Cruise.
They drilled a 1/2" hole in the transom just under the rubrail and to port of the motor. Take the gas pump ball off the gas line (near the tank) and put it back in line about a foot from the motor end. Run the hose through the transon from the outside and re connect. Now you can pump up pressure without lifting the hatch
and the hose is always easy to disconnect for tank removal. Both my c22s are setup this way. I also drilled a smaller hole for the altenator wire to the motor which connects inside the cowl with 2 snap connectors reversed so the can't be connected wrong. The setup has a much cleaner look than running lines and cables through the vents.
Larry Wilson
Phoenix, AZ

Boat Name: no name

Model/Year: C22/1982

Hull No. 11152

Hailing Port: Lake Pleasant, AZ
01/15/2009 10:18 PM Pacific Time

Wow, there are sure lots of good ideas contributed on this 5 year old thread that Randy jump started!. Sometimes the simple ideas are the best - like the fish line through the vent hose. Thanks, Lynn.

I also like the idea of cleaning up the way the alternator cable and fuel line are routed into the boat.

Robert - when you said "I also drilled a smaller hole for the altenator wire to the motor which connects inside the cowl with 2 snap connectors reversed so the can't be connected wrong." Are your connectors now located under the OB motor cover / cowling? Could you describe what that looks like? I like the idea of keeping the pass through for the cable and fuel line separate. What kind of snap connectors did you use?

Thanks to everyone for the great ideas!
Robert Donehoo
Duluth Ga

Boat Name: Shady Deal

Model/Year: Catalina 22 1979

Hull No. 8940

Hailing Port: Lake Lanier Ga
01/16/2009 10:38 AM Pacific Time

I used round plastic covered quick connects. On the wire end one is a bulletstyle male- and the other female+ and i run it through an existing drain hole under the cowl. The connectors under to cowl are covered so the + alt wire won't ground if vibrated out of position. You could also use other types of connectors that can't be reversed. A little 4200 or silicon can seal around the gas and elec. wire. The gas line pump ball on the outside of the transom is really nice.
Ryan Graham
Douglasville, Ga.

Boat Name: Luana Cordelia

Model/Year: C22 1978

Hull No. 8587

Hailing Port: Douglasville, Ga (on the hard)
12/11/2009 12:44 PM Pacific Time

My boat has 2 scuppers mounted through the gunwale. I believe these are supplied through Catalina Direct. One of the scuppers face forward and the other faces aft. I am not a huge fan of this idea, as it is a point for large amounts of water to enter. But, I religiously close the vent to my fuel tank. This should always be kept closed when not under power. The vent is only to provide air into the fuel tank so the engine does not create a vacuum in the fuel tank and starve it's self of fuel.
I would say, buy an updated good fuel tank and replace your fuel lines if you are still having problems. I found a small seal leak on my line last time I was out causing the engine to draw air into the lines. Having a engine that will not keep running is not a good way to start the day, when trying to get out of a tight and rocky marina.
Cynthia
Victoria BC

Boat Name: Merlin

Model/Year: 22/81

Hull No. C YH0025M81D

Hailing Port: Sidney BC
04/11/2010 9:54 PM Pacific Time

Last year I ended up sponging gasoline out of the port locker with a towel. There must be a better way.

I like the idea of the vented bin to keep the portable gas tank in, but I keep my dinghy motor in the port locker as well. It wouldn't fit down the lazarette hatch with a bin in there. Where do others store their dinghy motors? I don't have a stern pulpit rail. Are they strong enough to hang a 2 hp motor on?
Lynn Buchanan
Nevada City, CA

Boat Name: SAILYNN

Model/Year: SWING 1984

Hull No. 11994

Hailing Port: SCOTTS FLAT LAKE, CA
04/12/2010 3:42 PM Pacific Time

If you store gas be sure your storage area meets Coast Guard requirements. I've seen more than one newspaper article and pictures about boaters who stored motors or gas tanks down below that emitted fumes by leaking. When the boater went to light a BBQ or cook stove, bam!!! it was all over. I store my fuel on my 73 model in the cockpit tied down to the stern cockpit floor and tow my dinghy with the motor locked on it. When trailering, the motor is in the back of the pickup or when we had a Suburban, was in the boat cockpit wrapped with a piece of carpet.
Ryan Graham
Douglasville, Ga.

Boat Name: Luana Cordelia

Model/Year: C22 1978

Hull No. 8587

Hailing Port: Douglasville, Ga (on the hard)
04/18/2010 5:32 AM Pacific Time

I bleave the stern rails would easily store a 2 hp motor with a good mounting system.
Cynthia
Victoria BC

Boat Name: Merlin

Model/Year: 22/81

Hull No. C YH0025M81D

Hailing Port: Sidney BC
06/22/2011 10:01 PM Pacific Time

I too like to keep my gas can in the rear locker. I tried other methods but nothing was satisfactory. But gas fumes in the cabin or hold is absolutely not acceptable.

I used foam insulation to isolate the port locker, where I keep the gas can, from the rest of the boat, the kind of spray-in goo that comes out of the can like whipped cream. I wriggled into the lazarette and filled the gap under and behind the cockpit and every other gap leading to the cabin.

Then I drilled a 2 1/2" hole in the very aft of the deck and installed a cowl vent facing backward, and another 3" hole in the side, behind the windows, and installed another, slightly larger cowl vent facing forward. So whichever way the wind blows, it's blowing right through the locker, from end to end.

There is still that big hole covered only by the settee cushion, but that arrangement seems to be adequate with the ventilation cowls.
 
 
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Catalina Direct Discussion Topics / Catalina 22 Discussion Area / Cabin / Gasoline Fumes